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Filters for stock eos camera

Bluesman52
(@bluesman52)
Active Member

Hey Allan, I have a Canon EOS 60d unmodified. I will be doing imaging in a Bortle 9 area. I have Svbony CLS clip in for light pollution. Are there any others that could help? Could I use more than one at a time. And are there any filters that help with color in Nebula exposures using a stock camera. Your wealth of experience must have some trick to pass on.

Quote
Topic starter Posted : 12/02/2021 3:36 am
Allan Hall
(@asadmin)
Member Admin

If you are interested in using more than one filter at a time you need to examine the specifications of each filter and see where the bandpasses are. 

Each filter should have a sheet that shows what part of the spectrum it allows, and what part it blocks. If the second filter blocks something that is already blocked with the first filter, then you are wasting your time and making things dimmer (adding glass always reduces transmitted light). If the second filter blocks things that the first does not, and you want those areas blocked, then the combination might be beneficial.

I would say it is probably better to get one filter that blocks as much of the unwanted light as possible and avoid stacking filters. This should give you the maximum transmitted light and best images.

As for helping exposures of nebulae, you can get single bandpass filters such as a Ha filter like this one from Lumicrom. For other nebulae, you can try an OIII filter like this one from Celestron. A great place to look for these is at OPT where they have a good selection.

Note that real narrowband filters (single bandpass filters) are expensive. The cheap ones tend to just be colored filters that do not have the same effect.

I should also point out that using one of these on an unmodified DSLR can have less than dramatic effects as all or part of the spectrum of light you are trying to allow in using these types of filters may be blocked by the IR filter in your camera. I have had some luck with a Ha filter on an unmodified Nikon but it was not great.

If you really want to try a Ha filter on a DSLR I recommend the Baader Planetarium 35nm Ha filter instead of the standard 7nm or 8nm versions. It gives you a much better chance of getting a usable image on an unmodified camera.

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Posted : 12/02/2021 1:53 pm
Bluesman52
(@bluesman52)
Active Member

@asadmin Thank you Allan. Good information here. So I think the best thing for me to do at this point is just to image with the camera as is and see what I come away with before investing in something that may not change much. I may like what I get. The reality is I haven't even got the telescope yet. But the next clear night I get I am going to use the 130mm and do some short exposures to get a feel for the camera, software, stacking and processing.

I will be sure to let you see what I come up with. Just need some clear skies. Thanks again.

ReplyQuote
Topic starter Posted : 13/02/2021 3:35 am
Allan Hall
(@asadmin)
Member Admin

Sounds like a plan!

ReplyQuote
Posted : 22/02/2021 9:52 pm
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